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Entry-Level DPT: Course Descriptions


HBA 540 — Human Anatomy for Physical Therapists
(6 credits)
Lecture followed by laboratory dissection of the human body. Regional approach to the gross anatomy of the human body for physical therapy graduate students (DPT). The course is presented in three modules. Module one covers the back, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and perineum. Lectures will cover the regional anatomy of the above as well as conceptual information about the peripheral nervous system, the heart and respiratory system. Module two covers the brain, head and neck. Lecture will address the anatomy and organization of the central nervous system, the cranial nerves, introduction to the anatomy of the special senses and mastication. Module three will offer an expanded view of the functional anatomy of the limbs and musculoskeletal system. Lectures will address the functional anatomy of the hand and the foot as well as posture and locomotion. In module three clinical, faculty will address the latest developments in radiology and skeletal imaging, and the clinical anatomy of the back, shoulder, elbow, hand, hip, knee, and foot.
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HBA 542 - Advanced Human Anatomy for Physical Therapists
Regional approach to the gross anatomy of the lower limb for physical therapy graduate students (DPT). The course is presented in conjunction with HYA519, Kinesiology for Physical TherapistsRegional approach to the gross anatomy of the lower limb for physical therapy graduate students (DPT). The course is presented in conjunction with HYA519, Kinesiology for Physical Therapists.
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HAY 500 - Neuroscience I for Physical Therapy
(3.5 credits)
Neuroscience is the first of a two course series designed to introduce students to general principles of organization and function of the autonomic, peripheral and central nervous system. Presented principles in a systems approach to neuroscience. The anatomy of a system will be followed with its physiology, pathophysiology and clinical relevance to the physical therapist. Clinical topics include neurological testing related to cranial nerves and sensory processes.
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HAY 501 — Growth and Development Across The Life Span
(4 credits)
Presents an integrative approach to normal human growth and development throughout the life span. Examines developmental norms and sequences with emphasis on biophysical (motor and sensory), cognitive, language and psychosocial tasks. Discusses social, cultural and environmental influences. Covers prenatal, infant, child, adolescent, adult and older adult geriatric development, as well as related aging issues.
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HAY 502 — Psychosocial Aspects of Disability I
(1 credit)
Emphasizes the psychosocial aspects of disability as they affect the life of the individual. Topics include identification of pre-morbid factors that contribute to positive adjustment or maladaptive responses to disability; the influence of culture on individual and family expectations of the health care system; patient perspectives as consumers of the health care system; and changing roles in the family. Students will practice techniques of positive listening and role-play to develop skills in recognizing psychosocial factors during acquisition of patient history. Emphasizes utilization of psychosocial information in the establishment of a plan of care for patients across the life span.
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HAY 503 — Psychosocial Aspects of Disability II
(1 credit)
Explores the interactions of the individual with disability within the community. Focuses on concerns of the individual beyond physical rehabilitation. Topics include concomitant mental health issues; the mind-body connection; humor in medicine; complementary and alternative medicine; technology and disability; vocational rehabilitation; sexuality; domestic violence and interpersonal abuse; substance abuse; and terminal illness. Promotes identification and communication with local, regional and national resources that enable individuals with disabilities to engage in recreational, vocational, or educational endeavors.
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HAY 504 - Adult Neurological Rehabilitation I
(2 credits)
Prepares students to examine, evaluate, establish problem lists, and determine and write appropriate goals for individuals with neurological disorders. Presents fundamental skills including documentation, body mechanics, turning and positioning, bed mobility, wheelchair management, transfers and ambulation training. Trains students through role playing and videotape analysis to observe movement in an orderly manner. Students will develop evaluation skills appropriate for various neurological patient populations. Lab experiences and reports require written and verbal justification for student clinical decisions. Provides students with experiences choosing appropriate outcome measures and competence in performing these measures on volunteer patients. Prepares first year physical therapy students for clinical management during their first clinical affiliation. Prerequisites: HAY 500 Corequisite HAY 514.
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HAY 505 - Adult Neurological Rehabilitation II
(4 credits)
Establishes a context for the major explanatory concepts applied to the issues of coordination and skill and learning. Students will read original research papers as well as current literature pertaining to motor learning, motor programs and dynamic pattern theory. Students will analyze papers examining loss of function related to neurological disease or injury. A semester long project will integrate the major concepts. Prerequisites: HAY 500, HAY 504, HAY 552
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HAY 506 — Adult Neurological Rehabilitation III
(3 credits)
Course uses the ICF model to examine the impact of adult neurological or neuromuscular conditions on activities identified by an individual as essential to support physical, social, and psychological well being and to create a personal sense of meaningful living. Students continue practicing synthesis of examination data during the evaluation process, Emphasizes the development and implementation of appropriate intervention strategies based on the best evidence available for people with neurological or neuromuscular disorders. Prerequisites: HAY 500, HAY 504 and HAY 505
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HAY 507 - Orthopedic Physical Therapy I
(3.5 credits)
Introduces concepts of musculoskeletal subjective and objective examination. Sharpens student's evaluation skills as clinical decision-making and differential physical therapy diagnosis, prognosis and intervention are introduced in the framework of musculoskeletal dysfunction. Applies these general skills to various musculoskeletal dysfunctions of the lower extremities. Explores functional anatomy, including the osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, mycology and neurology of the lower extremities as they relate to surgical and non-surgical musculoskeletal conditions. Prerequisite: HAY 519
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HAY 508 — Orthopedic Physical Therapy II
(3.5 credits)
Builds on the concepts and skills of Orthopedic Physical Therapy I by integrating clinical decision-making and differential physical therapy diagnosis, prognosis and intervention of the lower extremities with the spine and upper extremities. Various musculoskeletal dysfunctions of the trunk and upper extremities are explored. Functional anatomy, including the osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, mycology and neurology of the trunk and upper extremities are discussed as they relate to surgical and non-surgical musculoskeletal conditions. Prerequisite: HAY 507
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HAY 509 — Pediatric Rehabilitation I
(3 credits)
Prepares students to examine, evaluate and provide physical therapy intervention for children with disabilities and special health care needs. Foundational knowledge in development, motor control and motor learning provides the basis for describing impairments of body function and structure and the physical therapy management of activity and limitations common in selected neurological and musculoskeletal pediatric diagnoses. Clinical decision making will include consideration of the interaction of the natural development of children with their disability, provision of services in natural environments, inclusion of child and caregiver concerns, and medicolegal issues of pediatric practice. Students will gain experience in selecting appropriate pediatric outcome measures, observation of movement in childhood, and goal setting through video analysis, demonstration, and field visits to pediatric clinics. Introduces therapeutic techniques appropriate to begin basic treatment of patients in a pediatric setting.
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HAY 510 — Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy
(3 credits)
Emphasizes the patient-client management model for cardiac and pulmonary patients in out-patient and home care settings. Includes interpretation of electrocardiograms, heart/lung auscultation, and the administration of graded exercise test protocols. Explores aerobic endurance exercise prescription and the use of appliances in elderly patients with congestive heart failure. Emphasizes the use of evaluative findings to develop a total plan of care. Prerequisites: HAY 517, HAY 526, HAY 527, HAY 528
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HAY 511 — Pediatric Rehabilitation II
(2 credits)
This course continues to develop the knowledge and skill necessary for the provision of physical therapy care to a wide variety of pediatric clients and patients. Building on the foundation gained in HAY 509, this course presents examination and interventions for subtle and complex movement dysfunctions including developmental coordination disorder, TBI, pediatric MS, childhood cancer, and obesity. Considers interventions appropriate for a variety of service delivery settings including NICU, home-based EI, and schools .Addresses the physical therapist's role in transitions between delivery settings. Students will examine evidence for therapeutic methodology as well as that of alternative and complementary regimes, including TAMO, hippotherapy, Conductive Education, and Theratogs. Students will have an opportunity to compare and contrast local fitness/wellness programs for pediatric populations. Prerequisite: HAY 509
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HAY 512 — Prosthetics and Orthotics
(4 credits)
Studies prosthetic and orthoses management as applied to a variety of patient populations across a life span. Addresses considerations of various pathology and medical surgical management to formulate appropriate patient examinations, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis and intervention that are consistent with physical therapy practice guidelines. Principals of normal biomechanics, pathomechanics, physiology and pathophysiology will be a major focus for evaluation, intervention and education of the vascular, neuromuscular, and / or musculoskeletal compromised patient that may utilizes prosthetic or orthotic devises. Basic principles of mechanical physics and material characteristics will be applied. Clinical site visits are scheduled to observe and practice patient evaluation, treatment and education techniques. Prerequisite: HAY 519
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HAY 514 - Neuroscience II for Physical Therapy
(3.5 credits)
Neuroscience II for Physical Therapy follows Gross Anatomy, which includes a section on Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience I for Physical Therapy. Neuroscience II for Physical Therapy demonstrates the role of the nervous system in normal movement control across the life span. This curriculum provides foundation for professional theory and practice courses which focus on dysfunction and treatment of such. This course will provide lab experience in muscle tone, balance, coordination and functional movement testing.
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HAY 517 — Exercise Physiology
(1 credit)
Reviews the normal physiology of the cardiopulmonary system. Presents the normal immediate response to exercise and long-term effects of exercise in the healthy well individual. Includes presentation of foodstuffs for energy production, metabolic pathways for production of ATP, and energy systems used in aerobic and anaerobic activities. The course includes strength and endurance exercise prescription for the healthy well individual. Also includes laboratory experiences for the measurement of vitals and select exercise testing. Prerequisite: HBA 540
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HAY 518 — Foundations of Exercise and Movement
(3.5 credits)
Presents an introduction to the fundamental principles of strength and flexibility. Fundamentals of muscle and connective tissue function from microstructure to macrostructure are considered in health and dysfunctional states through the life span. These basic principles will be expanded to explore the concept of myofascial mobility, extensibility and length. Students will combine the skills learned in Kinesiology with those learned in this course to begin the process of examination, evaluation and designing intervention programs for the movement dysfunction
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HAY 519 — Kinesiology
(5 credits)
Explores the kinetics and kinematics of normal, purposeful human movement. Integrates knowledge of human anatomy, physiology, mechanics and biomechanics as it applies to movement of the extremities and spine. Includes evaluation procedures such as manual muscle testing and measurement of joint range of motion. Direct patient contact is scheduled. Prerequisite: HBA 540
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HAY 524 — Health, Wellness, and Prevention in Physical Therapy
(3 credits)
Presents issues related to promotion of health and wellness and concepts of integrative medicine. Examines and integrates general fitness into the following clinical environments: obstetrics, occupational health and injury prevention, ergonomics, sports medicine (pre, post, and in season), obesity, chronic pain, pediatrics, geriatrics, and athletic programs for the physically and/or mentally challenged. Students will perform screening techniques for the assessment of the following wellness issues: school-based scoliosis, safety and accessibility of children play areas, cardiovascular fitness, and fall prevention in the elderly. Based upon the findings of screens and individual client goals, students will develop, implement and assess the effectiveness of a cohesive wellness program. Introduces issues related to the development of a wellness center and visits to established prevention programs in the community. Prerequisite: HAY 510
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HAY 525 — Advanced Therapeutic Exercise
(3 credits)
Provides students with the opportunity to apply and analyze therapeutic exercise techniques in order to formulate exercise programs for diverse patient and client populations. Students will be encouraged to discuss and build upon their knowledge of basic therapeutic techniques attained from previous coursework and clinical training experiences. Advanced techniques will be demonstrated and practiced in lab. Students will evaluate, set goals, develop therapeutic exercise programs and measure outcomes. Issues regarding frequency, intensity and duration of treatment will be discussed throughout the course. Prerequisites: HAY 507, 508, 518 and 519
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HAY 526 — Clinical Medicine and Pharmacology I
(3.5 credits)
Provides a foundation in medicine and differential diagnoses. Introduces the concepts of evidence-based practice, Nagi's model of disablement, client/patient management model, and an interaction model between patient, task and environment. These frameworks will guide the process of clinical decision-making. Integrates principles of pharmacology, diagnostic radiology and laboratory diagnostic testing to facilitate safe and effective patient management planning. Familiarizes students with medical terminology and abbreviations for efficient and effective chart reviewing and documentation. Explores select systemic diseases, focusing on epidemiology, pathology, histology, etiology, as well as primary and secondary clinical characteristics. Discusses and integrates subsequent medical and surgical management to formulate appropriate intervention indications, precautions and contraindications.
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HAY 527 — Acute Care in Physical Therapy
(4 credits)
Emphasizes use of the patient-client management model focused primarily on the acute care in-hospital setting. Includes examination techniques, transfers, bed positioning, orthopedic, pulmonary and cardiac care, and select post-surgical physical therapy intervention protocols. Includes documentation, discharge planning, and the use of appropriate ancillary services and equipment. Prerequisites: HAY 517, 526; co-requisite HAY 528.
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HAY 528 — Clinical Medicine and Pharmacology II
(4 credits)
Continues to build a foundation in medicine and differential diagnosis. Utilizes the concepts of evidence-based practice; Nagi's model of disablement; client/patient management model; and the interaction model as frameworks for clinical decision-making. Presents epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical characteristics and subsequent medical and surgical diagnoses and management of select disease/injury. Integrates pharmacology, diagnostic radiology and laboratory diagnostic testing into safe and effective patient management planning through clinical case study exercises. Focuses will be on the formulation of appropriate intervention indications, precautions and contraindications. Based on medical record review and analysis, students synthesize an appropriate patient/client management plan consistent with the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice. Prerequisites: HAY 500and 526.
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HAY 541 — Physical Agents Physical Therapy
(1.5 credits)
Physical modalities including superficial and deep thermal agents, hydrotherapy, aquatic therapy, intermittent compression, and mechanical traction, Emphasis on evidence-based practice with ample opportunity to learn from experienced clinicians through guest lectures and site visits. Students focus on pre-treatment assessment and physiological response to treatment as the basis for clinical decision making. Patient education, treatment preparation and performance, indications and contraindications will be covered for each modality. Supervised laboratory sessions provide a safe atmosphere for the administration of these agents as well as direct observation of clinical effects. Laboratory sessions and group discussions will be case study driven to foster critical thinking and collaborative learning. Prerequisite: HBA 540
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HAY 542 — Electrotherapy in Physical Therapy
(2.5credits)
Presents principles of electrophysics and the application to the human body in health and disease and relates principles to the use of electrophysiologic stimulators and testing equipment in physical therapy clinical practice. Discusses properties of excitable membranes and effects of electrical stimulation on muscle and nerve tissue. Promotes evidence-based practice through analysis of appropriate literature. Covers electrotherapeutic management of impairments and pathology of musculoskeletal system, neuromuscular system, cardiopulmonary system and the integument. Explores the role of electrotherapy as adjunctive modality in a comprehensive physical therapy treatment plan. Discusses fundamental skills for application of biphasic pulsed current, monophasic pulsed current, uninterrupted direct current, interferential electrical stimulation, Russian stimulation, microstimulation (MENS), transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS), neurostimulation (NMES), functional electrical stimulation (FES) and iontophoresis. Introduces biofeedback and electrodiagnostic testing: nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and electromyography (EMG). Prerequisites: All first and second year physical therapy courses.
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HAY 543 — Wound Care in Physical Therapy
(1credits)
Introduces the physical therapist¿s role in management of chronic wounds. Focuses on performing a comprehensive assessment designed to identify challenges to proper wound closure. Students will use the results of this assessment to form an appropriate plan of care based on the clinical presentation of the wound and the individual needs of each patient/client. Discusses mechanisms of integumentary healing in the human body including potential difficulties posed by cardiovascular, orthopedic, neurological and endrocinologic/metabolic disorders. Considers local factors implicated in delayed wound closure. Students learn to set appropriate goals and apply treatment interventions including wound irrigation and debridement, pressure relief, and choice of topical agents and dressing to promote efficient closure. Emphasizes evidence-based practice: focuses on pre-treatment assessment physiological response to treatment, and best available research as the basis for clinical decision making. Covers patient education, treatment preparation and performance, indications and contraindications for intervention. Laboratory sessions and group discussions will be case study driven to foster critical thinking and collaborative learning.
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HAY 545 — Ethics and Health Care for Physical Therapy
(1credits
Provides an overview of ethics in health care in a rapidly changing society. Explores ethical issues surrounding health care changes and public health policy. Includes an overview of the ethics within patient education and discussions involving the physical therapy professional code of ethics and standards. The student will learn how to approach ethical dilemmas using theoretical frameworks and decision-making processes. Introduces the student to the ethics within physical therapy and other health care professions through the use of case studies. Includes a review of classic cases in health care ethics involving issues such as euthanasia and organ transplants, from an ethical, legal and historical perspective. Entry-level physical therapy students only.
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HAY 552 — Research Methods for Physical Therapists: Design and Statistics
(4 credits)
Designed to teach entry level physical therapy students the fundamentals of reading and understanding research methods, design, and statistics. Includes reliability and validity, research design, descriptive statistics, statistical inference, test for experimental comparison, correlation, regressions, nonparametric tests, single subject design, and qualitative research. Addresses the relationship between statistics and research design by introducing relevant research articles in the health care field.
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HAY 553 — Computer Literacy and Evidence Based Practice
(1 credit)
Addresses the foundational skills practicing therapists need to effectively manage, integrate, and communicate information for clinical practice, research and professional activities. This course exists in three parts. Part I focuses on accessing and evaluating clinical information. Part II focuses on information organization and manipulation. Part III focuses on the management and professional communication of information. Entry-level physical therapy and post-professional DPT students.
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HAY 558 — Evidence Based Practice
(3 credits)
Explores a broad spectrum of research literature examining physical therapy practice. Uses literature as a tool to integrate students critical inquiry skills and depth of knowledge in biomechanical analysis, musculoskeletal measurement, cardiopulmonary functions, motor control and motor learning theory. Students judge the strength of the evidence of each paper and draw conclusions regarding its clinical significance in neuromotor and musculoskeletal rehabilitation. When lacking evidence, challenges students to suggest ways to strengthen the current evidence. Requires each student to facilitate a class discussion. Prerequisite: HAY 552. Entry-level physical therapy and post-professional DPT students.
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HAY 560 — Foundations of Professional Practice in Physical Therapy
(2 credits)
Examines the roles and responsibilities of the physical therapist in the present health care environment. Historical and ethical foundations of the profession, as well as current and emerging issues, are discussed. Explores the scope of practice of the Doctor of Physical Therapy. Introduces the format and function of the APTA Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Stresses the importance of professionalism, including active membership in the APTA. Explores the dynamics of professional relationships with patients, families, and other care providers. Entry-level physical therapy and post-professional DPT students.
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HAY 561 — Teaching, Consulting, Communicating in Clinical Education
(2 credits)
Examines different learning styles and their effect on the learning environment. The fundamentals of teaching as they apply to patient education, professional inservices, and clinical education are presented and practiced. Students are introduced to aspects of verbal and nonverbal communication, with the opportunity to work in small groups for application of these principles. The aspect of physical therapy consultation in clinical experiences as well as professional opportunities is explored. Preparation for the first clinical education experience, specifically clinical site and academic program expectations, professional behavior, and student responsibilities are discussed in detail.
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HAY 562 — Selected Topics in Clinical Instruction and Professional Development
(2  credits)
Provides framework for assuming the roles of a clinical instructor. Includes the preplanning period, structuring the actual clinical experience, and types of evaluation provided to physical therapy students. Explores various models of clinical education and opportunities for APTA Residencies and Fellowships. Emphasizes self assessment, communication skills and professional development.Links discussions with concurrent learning experiences in Clinical Intership II including learning opportunities, patient care and teaching styles. Explores in detail selected topics from APTA clinical performance instruments. Uses a case study for students to delve deeper into plan of care for a patient receiving treatment during the Clinical Practice II.
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HAY 570 — Physical Therapy Case Studies I
(1 credit Satisfactory/Fail)
First phase in a 3-course sequence designed to develop the student's ability to capture and utilize relevant knowledge and ideas, apply them appropriately within the patient management model, and assess the effectiveness of their interaction. In addition to examining, evaluating, prognosticating, diagnosing and developing and implementing intervention strategies, the students will observe, discover and rediscover how the four systems (neuromotor, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and integumentary) work together to influence function. Faculty and lab assistants will design and mentor problem-based activities and case studies that require students to problem solve, hypothesize and reason. Students will be expected to extract information from a case study, prioritize and sequence patient contact, and demonstrate professional behaviors including effective communication skills. Cases will incorporate patients from the community of diverse cultural backgrounds with and without pathology of the neuromotor, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and integumentary systems. Prerequisites: Year 1 fall courses. Entry-level physical therapy students only.
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HAY 571 — Physical Therapy Case Studies II
(1 credit Satisfactory/Fail)
Requires the development of examination, evaluation, and intervention plans for assigned patients in an acute care setting under faculty mentorship. Utilizes patients from the pediatric, oncology, general medicine, AIDS, neurological and surgical units. Requires students to manage time, delegate responsibility, document efficiently, perform appropriate discharge planning, and justify clinical decisions at each step in this process. Requires student group presentations with defense of clinical decisions for assigned case studies at the end of the integrative week. Prerequisites: All year 1 courses. Entry-level physical therapy students only.
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HAY 572 — Physical Therapy Case Studies III
(1 credit Satisfactory/Fail )
Third phase in a 3-course sequence designed to integrate course material throughout the first two years of the program curriculum. With each case study course, the demand on students for synthesis and integration will increase. Faculty and lab assistants involved in year 2 will design and mentor activities and case studies that require students to examine, evaluate, determine a differential diagnosis, prognosticate and develop and implement intervention strategies for case studies of all ages from diverse cultural backgrounds with complex neuromotor, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, and/or integumentary pathology/dysfunction. Prerequisites: All courses in years 1 and 2. Entry-level physical therapy students only.
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HAY 580 — Practicum
(3 credits)
A limited number of students may enroll in 3-6 credits of independent study in research, education, clinical practice, or management/administration. Each practicum project is uniquely designed to meet the needs of the student. Mentored by faculty with expertise in the area of study. Acceptable projects must include design, implementation and analysis phases. 3-6 credits by permission of the Program Director. Entry-level physical therapy and post-professional DPT students.
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HAY 595 — Clinical Internship I
(8 credits Satisfactory/Fail )
An eight-week course that provides students with their first full-time clinical experience. A licensed physical therapist is responsible for close supervision and guidance during the learning experience. Provides students with the opportunity to utilize the patient management model of care. Students participate in documentation, coordination of care and discharge planning. Students will perform reexaminations, measure patient outcomes, and modify interventions accordingly. Students will perform an in-service during this clinical experience. Students are required to submit guided journals to DCE via email to promote reflective thinking during clinical experience. Prerequisite: All first year courses
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HAY 602 - Issues in Health Care Administration
(3 credits )
Provides an understanding of the role of manager/supervisor as it relates to the goals and objectives of a physical therapy practice or department. Topics include communication skills in business management; ethical decision making in physical therapy practice; delivery systems; legislation and regulation; business planning; marketing and public relations.
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HAY 692 - Clinical Internship II
(6 credits Satisfactory/Fail)
A fifteen week part-time clinical experience. A licensed physical therapist is responsible for supervision during the learning experience. Students will provide direct patient care, collaborate with other health care professionals, coordinate care of patients, delegate and supervise support personnel and promote wellness and prevention services. Student will incorporate outcome measures into the evaluation process and suggest specific measure useful for the clinical setting. Students will perform an in-service and communicate regularly with DCE to promote reflective thinking during clinical experience. Prerequisites: All year 1 and 2 courses.
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HAY 693 - Clinical Internship III
(12 credits Satisfactory/Fail )
A twelve-week full-time clinical experience. A licensed physical therapist is responsible for supervision during the learning experience. The students will provide direct patient care, collaborate with other health care professionals, coordinate care of patients, delegate and supervise support personnel, and promote wellness and prevention services. Students are able to incorporate outcome measures into the evaluation process and suggest specific measures useful for their particular clinical setting. Students will perform an in-service during this clinical experience and communicate regularly with DCE via email to promote reflective thinking during clinical experience. Prerequisite: All courses in curriculum through fall year 3.
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HAY 694 - Clinical Internship IV
(12 credits Satisfactory/Fail)
A twelve week full-time capstone clinical experience. A licensed physical therapist is responsible for supervision during the learning experience. Students will render evidence-based practice and perform as an entry-level physical therapist upon completion of this clinical experience. Students are expected to fully participate in all aspects of physical therapist's scope of practice including direct patient care, documentation, consultation, education, critical inquiry, and administration in the clinical setting. perform as an entry-level physical therapist upon completion of this clinical experience. Students will perform an in-service during this clinical experience and communicate regularly with DCE via email to promote reflective thinking during clinical experience. Student will explore an area of interest outside patient management through the completion of a project designed to meet the needs of the clinical site in coordination with the DCE and clinical site CCCE. Prerequisites: All courses in Years 1-3