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Course Descriptions

HAX 664 Conceptual Foundations of Disability Studies
Disability studies is an area study that focuses on the experiences and representation of disability across multiple realms – including social, environmental, cultural, regional, historical, economic and political. There are clear intersections between the study of disability and other area studies, such as race, gender, social status, and sexuality. This course traces the conceptual foundations of disability studies beginning with 19th and early 20th century theories of degeneration and eugenics as well as scholarship from the same period that countered eugenics. We will use period sources to study 20th century movements to institutionalize, sterilize, and euthanize disabled people. We will refer to theorists from the 1960s and 1970s who influenced the theoretical development of the new field of disability studies. We will then explore foundational disability studies scholarship of the 1980s and 1990s as the field established itself first in the social sciences and then the humanities.

HAX 667/ EGL 592 Disability Studies Language, Narrative and Rhetoric
This course focuses on how language and rhetoric frame how disability is perceived, experienced, and treated. It will include critical and rhetorical analysis of professional discourses as well as personal disability narratives and memoirs. The Society for Disability Studies, an interdisciplinary organization, says in its mission statement, “disability is a key aspect of human experience.” So is language.  It will explore the interdisciplinary nature of disability studies and the roles language and rhetoric play in representations of disability. Some questions to be explored include: In what ways do clinical or professional discourses and personal narratives reveal experiences of power and powerlessness? How is the bodily experience of disability described in professional contexts as compared to personal narratives? How does description and perception influence the practice of professionals and quality of life for people with disabilities? What assumptions about disability are revealed through rhetorical analysis? These questions will help frame our attention in this course to representations of disability in a variety of texts: academic, professional, literary, clinical, personal, and visual.

HAX 668 Emerging Areas of Disability Studies
Disability studies is an area study that focuses on the experiences and representation of disability across multiple realms – including social, environmental, cultural, regional, historical, economic and political. This is an emerging field with new research and topic areas developing constantly. This course will allow focus on the intersections of disability with other emerging area studies such as gender, class, sexuality, race and global studies. It will also encompass study of different emerging disciplinary areas of disability studies in the social sciences, health sciences, humanities, business, and technology. We will explore the connections between disability activism, art, and scholarship in the 21st century. Finally the course will trace emerging regional distinctions in disability studies research and scholarship, especially between Northern and Southern Countries. 

HAX 665 Disability Participation and Justice
Disability studies is an area study that focuses on the experiences and representation of disability across multiple realms – including social, environmental, cultural, regional, historical, economic and political. This course will explore the concepts of “Participation” and “Justice” as they relate to disability experience. It will introduce research strategies – participatory methods and methodologies – for disability studies research in the applied social and health sciences. We will discuss ethical issues in this type of research. To understand what the concepts of “Participation” and “Justice” mean to disabled people both in research and in daily life, students will be exposed to social analysis, healthcare discourse, and research on the evolution of healthcare practices, cultural beliefs, and social structures influencing the treatments, services, and opportunities available to disabled people in the United States and internationally.

HAX 669: Disability and Health in Local and Global Contexts
Critically examines the experiences of people with disabilities in a local and global context and examines the connections between the two contexts. Utilizes policy documents, ethnographies, memoirs, program evaluations, and multi-media and provides the tools to critically evaluate local and global disability experiences as well as programs and interventions.

Electives
Possible electives are reviewed by the DS Certificate Director to assess whether the content is appropriate to be included as electives for the Certificate Program. The Director will solicit electives from affiliate faculty every semester and will add new electives to the list as needed. A current list of electives will be distributed to certificate program students and will also be listed on our web page. In some cases courses may be used as either required or elective courses.

HAX 667/ EGL 592 Disability Studies Language, Narrative and Rhetoric
This course focuses on how language and rhetoric frame how disability is perceived, experienced, and treated. It will include critical and rhetorical analysis of professional discourses as well as personal disability narratives and memoirs. The Society for Disability Studies, an interdisciplinary organization, says in its mission statement, “disability is a key aspect of human experience.” So is language.  It will explore the interdisciplinary nature of disability studies and the roles language and rhetoric play in representations of disability. Some questions to be explored include: In what ways do clinical or professional discourses and personal narratives reveal experiences of power and powerlessness? How is the bodily experience of disability described in professional contexts as compared to personal narratives? How does description and perception influence the practice of professionals and quality of life for people with disabilities? What assumptions about disability are revealed through rhetorical analysis? These questions will help frame our attention in this course to representations of disability in a variety of texts: academic, professional, literary, clinical, personal, and visual.

HAX 665 Disability Participation and Justice
Explores concepts of “Participation” and “Justice” as they relate to disability experience. Introduces research strategies, participatory methods and methodologies for disability studies research in the applied social and health sciences. Discusses ethical issues in disability research and what it means to disabled people in daily life. Examines social analysis, healthcare discourse, and research on the evolution of healthcare practices, cultural beliefs, and social structures influencing the treatments, services, and opportunities available to disabled people in the United States and internationally.

HAX 663 Disability, Occupation and Community
Inspired by disability justice social movements in the US and abroad, this course presents politically engaged critical approaches to disability that intersect community organizations, the arts and academic fields including occupational therapy, disability studies and anthropology. Broader than a medical category, disability identity recognizes the political and economic dimensions of disability inequity as it related to other forms of inequality and disadvantage. Themes include all permutations of the concept of occupy; disability justice/decolonization; participation and training for collaborations; marginalization and minorization; technology; struggle, creativity, and change.

HAX 669 Disability and Health in Local and Global Contexts
Critically examines the experiences of people with disabilities in a local and global context and examines the connections between the two contexts. Utilizes policy documents, ethnographies, memoirs, program evaluations, and multimedia and provides the tools to critically evaluate local and global disability experiences as well as programs and interventions.

HAX 690 Independent Study in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Independent study proposals in health and rehabilitation sciences. Approval of independent study proposal and credit hours required prior to registration

HAX 693 Directed Readings in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Provides faculty directed readings and guided discussion to synthesize selected content related to the current course curriculum and/ir to the students’ research interests. Through the guided readings, the students will learn foundational and advanced theoretical constructs that will be important underpinnings of their future studies and doctoral research. Specifically, studies may focus in the concentration areas of rehabilitation and movement science, disability studies, or behavioral and community health. A critical analysis of readings may include theoretical constructs, methodologies, and/or interpretation of results. The course will include analytical writings and a summative paper.

WST 680: Interdisciplinary Research Design
This interdisciplinary seminar guides students engaged in feminist, liberatory, and social justice oriented projects through the process of research design. We will explore interdisciplinary ideas and debates voiced by scholars and activists about the relationship between theory and research practice, and the conduct of research and research outcomes. Students will be introduced to an array of research methods available across the Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences and Sciences, think critically about their use, and gain some hands-on experience with methods. This seminar is designed as a workshop to apply knowledge of methods and methodologies to students' own research, and over the semester, students will develop either a research proposal for funding agencies and/or their dissertation proposal (prospectus). Course topics will include formulating and refining research questions; developing appropriate theoretical frameworks; articulating scholarly value; and thinking critically about the methods used in feminist interdisciplinary research. Students are expected to work collaboratively, presenting their individual works-in-progress to the class for constructive critique.

WST 610 Madness and Civilization 1960-1980
A variable topics seminar course in women's studies for the advanced student. Topics might include feminist peace politics, women in Third World cinema, feminist theology, or feminist philosophy. Course may be repeated as topic varies. Sections of this course are co-scheduled with SOC 509, PHI 615, and PHI 616.

WST 600 Feminist Interdisciplinary Histories and Methods
 Rather than begin with an exploration of “the” feminist methodology in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, or an account of “the” history of feminism, this course will explore what counts as “history,” as “method,” and as “evidence” in feminist scholarship. Since its emergence as a distinct knowledge project within the academy, feminism has sought to raise questions about how we know what we know, who gets to speak and for whom, and what are legitimate objects of study and fields of inquiry. Our goal will less be to seek answers to these (and other) questions, but to trace some of the ways in which feminist scholars have sought to intervene in debates about both the what and how of knowledge production in its many (inter-trans-multi-)disciplinary forms. A central part of the feminist project has been an engagement in self-reflexive questioning of the status, history, theories, methods, attachments, and aspirations of feminist scholarship. This course will continue that practice. To that end, students are encouraged to engage with the material with their own projects in mind, and to reflect on the histories and methods they are drawn to in their own work.
HCB 501 Compassionate Care, Medical Humanities, and the Illness Experience
This course will introduce students to major interpretations of the illness experience, to several classical biographical and autobiographical accounts of illness, and to the important dynamic of compassionate care in the healing relationship. The patient-as-person will be emphasized throughout, as well as the ways in which respect for and empathy toward the patient impacts diagnostic accuracy, patient adherence, and patient and professional satisfaction. Some emotional dynamics of the illness experience will be addressed, such as hope, through the work of eminent physician-writers such as Jerome Groopman, MD. The dynamics of medical mistakes and forgiveness will be explored through psychiatrist Aaron Lazarre’s influential writings on effective medical apologies. Some philosophical and metaphysical aspects of personhood and self-identity will be introduced.

HCB 502 Landmark Cases in Bioethics
What is a life worth living? How do we decide—and who decides—when to use medical technologies such as incubators, ventilators, transplants and reproductive technologies? This is an intensive introduction to some of the cases in medical ethics that have changed the ways that we are born, cared for, and die in American hospitals. Examples of topics include: vaccination and public health; eugenics and human subjects research ethics; the right of privacy and health care; end-of-life planning and treatment; women’s bodies and fetal rights; disability rights; religious beliefs and health care; triage and allocation of scarce resources; mental illness and individual rights; global clinical trials; and, bioethics and culture.


HCB 503 Traditions and Values in Bioethical Conflicts
This course serves as an introduction to Western moral and religious traditions and to the positions about killing, saving, and enhancing that these traditions have informed. It explores the interface between religion and biomedical ethics and then delves into specific issues in health care in light of more general normative concerns such as justice, love, autonomy and rights, utilitarianism, self-sacrifice, gender, virtue, and community. The issues with which the course deals address the plights of real people, in the concrete, who come from particular backgrounds and whose set of values may make them sometimes recalcitrant to possibilities that technology has made (or is just now making) available.

HCB 504 Special Topic in Biotechnology
Just because we can do it, does this mean that we should do it? This course takes a focused look at controversial practices in health care settings, such as organ donation and enhancements, which have been (and are continuing to be) made available with the advancement of technology. Ought we to regard that which technology makes available as uncontroversially good? If not, why not? What sorts of new issues regarding distributive justice, autonomy, utility, and compassion are ours to consider carefully because of the changing world in which we live?

HCB 510 Literature, Compassion, and Medical Care
How does literature help us understand the nature of human illness and suffering? Can written works of art, ancient and contemporary, that depict moments of compassion and compassionate acts lay bare the moral, spiritual, psychological, and physical reality of suffering? There is a long association between literature and medicine, from the viewpoint of physician-writers, such as Anton Checkov and William Carlos Williams, whose literary skills have eclipsed their medical backgrounds. Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson were the creations of a physician-writer, Arthur Conan Doyle. Physicians portrayed in literature, such as Dr. Bernard Rieux, in Albert Camus’ The Plague, have also explored the relationship between patient and doctor, the nature of healing. This semester-long course will study these relationships through reading of poetry, drama, fiction, memoir, and essay and reflect on the nature of suffering, the intrinsic human need for compassion, and the implications for health and healing.

HCB 511 Bioethics, Disability & Community
Most people will experience disability at some point in their lives, and for some it will shape their social, personal, family, educational, and employment experiences. Viewpoints on disabilities which have emerged in policy and the broader culture have been explicitly challenged by emerging communities of people with disabilities who seek to speak for themselves and claim full inclusion in society. In this context, bioethicists and disability scholars have found points of both common cause and stark disagreement over issues such as neonatal and end-of-life care, the value and values inherent medical decisions and their outcomes. These bioethical debates occur in the context of debates over the rights of individuals with disabilities to self-determination, accommodations for work and schooling, and the potential for people with disabilities to make unique contributions because of--rather than despite--their disabilities. This course will consider major debates in bioethics in light of recent scholarship in disability studies, drawing on perspectives from philosophy, literature and narrative, history, and sociology.

HCB 513 Disease and Society
What is disease? How do the beliefs, politics, and economies of particular societies shape how diseases are defined, experienced, and treated? In this seminar, students will explore these questions by analyzing historical documents, scientific reports, and historical scholarship. We will look at disease from multiple perspectives — as a biological process, clinical entity, population phenomenon, historical actor, and personal experience. We will pay special attention to how diseases have been recognized, diagnosed, named, classified and counted in different times, places, cultures, and settings based on different environmental and social conditions, medical ideas, diagnostic technologies, and available treatments. The course will begin with a review of major approaches to understanding the manifold relationships between disease and society. The remainder of the course will view disease and society relationships through the lens of specific issues, such as epidemic disease, consumption and affluence, globalization, and risk.

HCB 514 Global Bioethics
Bioethics is an American invention. Ideas about medicine and morality, of course, go back to antiquity and are documented as medical ethics in Europe, medical morality in China, and under many other names in cultures around the world. Recently, the process of globalization of ideas, medical practices, clinical trials, and migration of patients has led to clashes of culture around issues such as the appropriate standards and control groups for clinical trials, organ transplantation, brain death, and end-of-life care. Issues of religion, morality, public policy, disability rights and policy, and health system structure and payment all shape how particular societies decide to manage divisive issues such as the beginning and end of life. This course will draw on a growing literature on global and transnational cases, policies, and traditions in the ethics of health, public health, and health care.

HCB 515 Health Policy, History & Ethics
Who gets sick? Who gets health care, what kind, and in what setting? This course covers the major health policy issues of the United States today, including the health status of the U.S. as a whole, the social and economic determinants of health, the role of personal and public health services in affecting health, the organization and financing of health services, and the multiple factors affecting health policies. We will explore the evolution of the US health care system in the past century, and debates about rights to health care or lack thereof, health disparities, conflicts of interest, and the ethics of health policy and practice.

HCB 517 The Problem of Evil: Philosophical, Biological, and Social Dimensions
What is the nature of evil? Can it be the result of brain malfunction, something that is genetically predetermined? Or, is evil something which is part of or at least necessary to know the good? Alternatively, is evil an arbitrary designation, a perspective from which we can wrest ourselves given the right sort of reinvention? In this class, we shall address the problem of evil from scientific, social-scientific, and philosophical perspectives, using fiction and non-fictional sources. Examples of medical evil, such as the Nazi doctors or Tuskeegee, can be introduced as case studies.

HCB 520 Bioethics and Film
Film and television, both fiction and nonfiction, capture many of the human tragedies, challenges, and possibilities that are debated in bioethics books, articles, newspapers, on hospital ethics committees, and in daily clinical care. This course will explore themes of birth, death, hope, fear, faith, finitude, and resource allocation through watching, analyzing, and reading about bioethical issues in visual media. The course will draw on material from philosophical ethics to history, health policy and film criticism to place these issues and their portrayals in context.

HCB 523: Special Topics in Medical Humanities
As with all multidisciplinary pursuits, the medical humanities project is characterized by an ongoing negotiation among its practitioners over methods, scope and goals. This course will examine, in detail, one of the latest debates within the field.

HCB 524: Special Topics in Bioethics
Bioethicists are frequently asked to consider the ethical ramifications of new research findings and emerging technologies as they arise. This course will examine one such issue in close detail.

DAN 568 Dance Improvisation
The practice of dance and movement investigation through discipline, spontaneity, and awareness. Skills in improvisation will be developed through creative projects and experiments in dance. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. This course satisfies the SBC category ARTS/HFA+

PSY610-08: Autism Spectrum Disorders: From Diagnosis to Treatment
This course is designed as a discussion of current research into the causes (etiology), types (nosology), characteristics (symptomatology), and treatment of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). ASDs are now considered to be among the most common developmental psychological disorders, with recent prevalence estimates exceeding 1 in 68 (Centers for Disease Control, 2014). They are also among the least understood, with increasingly frequent media reports and publicity efforts often focusing on folk treatments, anecdotal evidence, and other non-empirical data on ASDs. This trend warrants a focus on the rapidly-growing body of research into understanding the cause, correlates, and treatment of ASDs. The primary goal of this course is to provide an introduction to the field of contemporary empirical research on ASDs. We will begin the course by exploring the history and current status of ASDs. We will then explore the many characteristics (neurobiological, behavioral, cognitive, and social) associated with ASDs, and theories of ASD cause and course. Finally, we will explore the array of current empirically-supported treatments for ASDs, and consider future directions for intervention research. In addition, this course will emphasize the importance of engaging in critical, independent thinking and thoughtful discussion regarding contemporary research and modern news stories in this area. Relatedly,while this course is pan-theoretical and -methodological, (i.e. designed to acquaint students with a variety of theories and approaches), we will largely draw upon the fields of developmental psychopathology, social cognition, and social neuroscience to explore the many facets of ASDs.