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FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What are the prerequisites for the Stony Brook ATP?
  2. What do I need prior to entry into the Stony Brook graduate ATP?
  3. How do I apply to the ATP?
  4. How many students are accepted into the program each year?
  5. Can I apply to the program even if I haven’t completed all of the prerequisites?
  6. Why are observation hours a requirement for admittance into the ATP; can they be completed off-campus?
  7. Can I transfer from another school with a similar program?
  8. Can I do my prerequisites at another school?
  9. Is the program accredited?
  10. What is the student to teacher ratio in the program?
  11. What are the required courses when enrolled in the Athletic Training graduate program?
  12. Is there a minimum GPA that must be maintained while in the program?
  13. Is it possible to fail and be removed from the program?
  14. Are there scholarship opportunities if I get into the program?
  15. What is better about Stony Brook's athletic training program compared to other similar programs?
  16. Can I transfer to another school with a similar program?
  17. How demanding is the program and roughly how much time would I have to devote weekly to the program in and out of class?
  18. How much clinical time would students be expected to complete each week?
  19. Would I complete all of my clinical experience at Stony Brook?
  20. Do students in the program travel with teams while completing their clinical experience?
  21. Can I choose which sport I’d like to work with for clinical experience?
  22. Will I have time to work while I am in the program?
  23. Is housing provided for the program's summer classes?
  24. Who should I contact if I am interested in the Athletic Training Program and want to learn more about it?
  25. What are the requirements for becoming a certified athletic trainer?
  26. Where do ATs work?
  27. What are graduates of the ATP doing now?
  28. Is there a placement service for graduates?
  29. What is an athletic trainer?
  30. After graduating from the ATP, can I immediately enter a position as a certified athletic trainer?
  31. What is the Board of Certification (BOC) Exam?
  32. Once certified, do I ever have to renew my certification?
  33. What are some common misconceptions about the role of a certified athletic trainer?
  34. What’s the difference between an athletic trainer and a physical therapist?
  35. What’s the difference between an athletic trainer and a personal trainer?
  36. Do athletic trainers only treat athletes?
  37. What is the average starting salary for an ATC?
  38. How do I find the Athletic Training Office?

Question #1: What are the prerequisites for the Stony Brook ATP?
Answer: The prerequisite courses for application to the Stony Brook ATP can be found on our website at the following link: Requirements
Question #2: What do I need prior to entry into the Stony Brook graduate ATP?
Answer: A completed baccaleauerate degree along with requiremed coursework, Basic Life Support CPR, 50 observation hours with an Athletic Trainer, 3 reference letters, and ATCAS application are required to apply for admission into Stony Brook ATP.
Question #3: How do I apply for to the ATP?
Answer: There is an online application process via ATCAS. Applications will be reviewed and interviews offered on a first come first served basis as the application is verified on ATCAS or until the application closes on the deadline of March 15, 2020, for a May 26, 2020 start date.
Question #4: How many students are accepted into the program each year?
Answer: 20 students can be accepted each year.
Question #5: Can I apply to the program even if I haven’t completed all of the prerequisites?
Answer: The online ATCAS application process allows for the student to monitor their prerequisite course completion. All prerequisites must be completed by the end of the spring term of the year for which applicants are applying. Acceptance into the program is not granted without completion of the prerequisite coursework. 
Question #6: Why are observation hours a requirement for admittance into the ATP; how can they be completed?
Answer: The observation hours give the prospective applicant a “hands on” impression of the daily activities of athletic trainers and allow him or her to experience the profession. Contact a athletic trainer who is in good standing (has current BOC# and state licensed) and ask to observe them while in their facility. They should verify in writing that you have completed the required observation hours.sign a All observation hours are completed on-campus.
Question #7: Can I transfer from another school with a similar program?
Answer: Acceptance of a transfer student from another CAATE accredited ATP is reviewed on a case-by-case basis. All of the completed coursework of the transfer candidate must be reviewed and submitted for approval before a decision can be made.
Question #8: Can I do my prerequisites at another school?
Answer: Yes.
Question #9: Is the program accredited?
Answer: Yes, the Stony Brook ATP received a 10 year re-accreditation through 2021 and is currently applying for a degree change with CAATE.
Question #10: What is the student to teacher ratio in the program?
Answer: With a class of 20, the student to full-time faculty ratio is 7:1.
Question #11: What are the required courses when enrolled in the graduate Athletic Training program?
Answer: The list of courses taken for the athletic training program: Curriculum
Question #12: Is there a minimum GPA that must be maintained while in the program?
Answer: Students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average to remain in good academic standing and participate in clinical affiliations. Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C+” in each course in the athletic training program.  

Question #13: Is it possible to fail and be removed from the program?
Answer: Professional courses (HAL) must be taken in a sequential manner. Students who receive the grade of “C-” or below must first retake the course before progressing to the next course in the sequence. ATP professional courses may only be repeated once. A student who receives a course grade of “C“, may progress on to the next sequence, but must remediate the insufficient grade. Failure to obtain the grade of “C+” or higher in two attempts may result in the student being dismissed from the program. Minimum grade of “C+” is required in each course.

Question #14: Are there scholarship opportunities if I get into the program?
Answer: Scholarships are available to qualified students from various the University and professional organizations, including NYSATA, EATA, and NATA.
Question #15: What is better about Stony Brook's athletic training program compared to other similar programs?
Answer: While all CAATE-accredited programs meet the same minimum requirements, the athletic training program at Stony Brook University is designed to provide quality classroom, laboratory, and online instruction in conjunction with hands on clinical experiences at NCAA Division I, II and III athletic programs and competitive local high school sports. Our program is dedicated to contributing to the body of knowledge in our profession by continuing to encourage various research initiatives. By being embedded within athletics and medicine within our community we promote building relationships through interaction with physicians and valuable community service involvement. 
Question #16: Can I transfer to another school with a similar program?
Answer: The ability to transfer into another CAATE-accredited ATP can only be determined by that college or university.
Question #17: How demanding is the program and roughly how much time would I have to devote weekly to the program in and out of class?
Answer: While there is no clear-cut answer, the didactic and clinical coursework require both time and time management skills from the student. The amount of time spent outside of class and clinical hours for studying and coursework completion can be determined only by the student’s schedule and habits.
Question #18: How much clinical time would students be expected to complete each week?
Answer: Students are required to attend clinical experience a minimum of 5 days per week with one of those days being on the weekend. Credit allotment for the Practicum courses are based on the time devoted to fulfilling the requirements of the clinical experience.
Question #19: Would I complete all of my clinical experience at Stony Brook?
Answer: All students will be assigned off-campus as well as on-campus clinical experiences during the course of the program.
Question #20: Do students in the program travel with teams while completing their clinical experience?
Answer: There is the opportunity to travel with teams to away contests. Travel is determined by budget concerns and can vary from team to team. During the course of the clinical experience, it is expected that the student will travel for a minimum of one day trip and one overnight trip with an assigned Preceptor.
Question #21: Can I choose which sport I’d like to work with for clinical experience?
Answer: Students are assigned to a Preceptor for their clinical experience, not to a particular sport. The students’ clinical assignments are determined by the Clinical Coordinator and must meet the requirements of accreditation.
Question #22: Will I have time to work while I am in the program?
Answer: While outside employment is not prohibited, the student should use good judgment when deciding to work. The clinical experience must be the first priority outside of coursework.
Question #23: Is housing provided for the program's summer classes?
Answer: Yes, students are able to live on-campus through Campus Residences. Information regarding summer housing can be found at: https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/studentaffairs/res/housing/_summer_housing/index.php
Question #24: Who should I contact if I am interested in the Athletic Training Program and want to learn more about it?

Answer: For information, contact Trish Volz, Program Assistant, at 631-632-ATEP (2837) or via email at Patricia.Volz@stonybrook.edu


Question #25: What are the requirements for becoming an Athletic Trainer?
Answer: To become a certified athletic trainer, a student must graduate with bachelors or master's degree from an accredited professional athletic training education program and pass a comprehensive test administered by the Board of Certification (BOC)
Question #26: Where do ATs work?
Answer: Athletic trainers treat a range of patients and can work in a variety of settings. Regardless of their practice setting, athletic trainers practice according to their education, scope of practice and state practice act.. Athletic trainers’ work settings include secondary schools, colleges and universities, professional sports, higher education and emerging settings such as: the performing arts, physician practice, public safety, military, occupational health and health care administration.

Question #27: What are graduates of the Stony Brook ATP doing now?
Answer: Information regarding graduates of the SBU ATP can be found in the alumni perspectives section of our website.
Question #28: Is there a placement service for graduates?
Answer: The NATA Career Center provides job listing service for its members looking for a position or employers with positions available. Also, the Stony Brook University Career Center is available to students to educate, prepare and connect graduates with employment opportunities.  
Question #29: What is an athletic trainer?
Answer:

Athletic Trainers (ATs) are health care professionals who render service and treatment, under the direction of, or in collaboration with, a physician.  This is done in accordance with the education and training provided within CAATE accredited programs and the states' statutes, rules and regulations. As part of the healthcare team, services provided by ATs include injury and illness prevention, wellness promotion and education, emergent care, examination and clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention, and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions. Athletic training has been recognized by the American Medical Association as a health care profession since 1990. The AMA also recommends employment of athletic trainers in every high school to keep America’s youth safe and healthy. For more information: National Athletic Trainers' Association


Question #30: After graduating from the ATP, can I immediately enter a position as an athletic trainer?
Answer: Graduation from the SBU ATP makes a student eligible to take the BOC exam. Successful application and completion of the BOC exam allows someone to call him or herself an athletic trainer.
Question #31: What is the Board of Certification (BOC) Exam?
Answer: The BOC exam is the national entry-level examination for athletic training. Successful completion of the BOC exam, current CPR/AED certification, and an athletic training professional degree results in the candidate earning the credential of certified athletic trainer (ATC).
Question #32: Once certified, do I ever have to renew my certification?
Answer: Yes, when an Athletic Trainer (AT) renews their national certification, it shows they value professional development, evidence based practice and are committed to the BOC mission of serving in public protection. Continuing education (CE) requirements are intended to promote continued competence, development of current knowledge and skills and enhancement of professional skills and judgment. ATs must complete a predetermined number of continuing education units (CEUs) during the certification maintenance period. 
Question #33: What are some common misconceptions about the role of an athletic trainer?
Answer: Some common misconceptions of athletic trainers are that they only know how to tape for injuries, don’t know how to perform rehabilitation, are strictly involved with weight training or fitness instruction, and that the educational requirements to become an AT are easy. The statutory title of “athletic trainer” is a misnomer but is derived from the profession’s historical roots. Athletic trainers provide medical services to all types of people – not just athletes participating in sports – and do not train people as personal or fitness trainers do.
Question #34: What’s the difference between an athletic trainer and a physical therapist?
Answer: Athletic trainers and physical therapists are both medical professionals who help people recover from injury, but there are also some key differences between these professions. Physical therapists are primarily responsible for rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses. While physical therapists work with orthopedic patients, they also work closely with a number of patients with medical conditions that athletic trainers don’t traditionally rehabilitate, including stroke, multiple sclerosis, and traumatic brain injury patients. While athletic trainers rehabilitate mostly orthopedic injuries, they are also responsible for the prevention and immediate care of injuries and illnesses, providing a continuum of care. An athletic trainer is one who is is on-site at the time of injury/illness, treats it immediately, and continues throughout the rehabilitation/return to activity process with the patient.
Question #35: What’s the difference between an athletic trainer and a personal trainer?
Answer: Although the name is misleading, athletic trainers have a significantly different and larger scope of practice than personal trainers. They are a qualified medical profession and required to have a bachelors or masters in athletic training, complete a rigorous program at a CAATE accredited university, pass a comprehensive certification exam, and uphold all standards of practice of the NATA and BOC. In addition, licensure is required in all states except for California where litigation is still in progress. Athletic training is based in the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries as well as emergent care. Personal trainers, while knowledgeable and important in their role, are not qualified to act as athletic trainers in any situation. A personal trainer can provide information and education regarding fitness and strength training but is not a medical professional able to provide diagnosis, care, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.
Question #36: Do athletic trainers only treat athletes?
Answer: Athletic trainers provide medical services to all types of patients, not just athletes participating in sports, and can work in a variety of job settings. Athletic trainers relieve widespread and future workforce shortages in primary care support and outpatient rehab professions and provide an unparalleled continuum of care for the patients. Athletic trainers improve functional outcomes and specialize in patient education to prevent injury and re-injury. Preventative care provided by an athletic trainer has a positive return on investment for employers. ATs are able to reduce injury and shorten rehabilitation time for their patients, which translates to lower absenteeism from work or school and reduced health care costs. 

Question #37: What is the average starting salary for an AT?
Answer: Starting salary will vary depending on work setting and education level, but a professional-level AT can expect to earn between $45,000 and $65,000 according to the 2016 NATA Athletic Training Salary.
Question #38: How do I find the Athletic Training Office?
Answer:
  1. The ATP is housed in the Sports Complex (G-33) on west campus.
  2. Directions to the ATP Office:
  3. Enter the Sports Complex thru the Pritchard Gym entrance (near Campus Recreation Building).
  4. Stay to your right; Look for Athletic Training on sign over the staircase.
  5. Proceed down the stairs to the ground floor.
  6. When you exit the stairwell make a right
  7. Go through a set of double doors and the Athletic Training Office & Lab (G-33) will be the second door on your right.

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